Tom in the News

2010

--/--/---- Health Care Reform Hinges on Act's Repeal

--/--/2010 Washington Arms Collectors Gun News Magazine

10/30/2010 Campbell Says Moxie Media Deserves Wallop -- Despite Putting Out Mailers for Him in 2nd District Race

10/27/2010 Campbell is Best for 2nd District

10/22/2010 Final Days 'Hectic' for Campbell. Wilcox

10/22/2010 Loop Hoopla

10/20/2010 Republican vs. Republican in Second District

10/14/2010 Former Democratic Leaders Urge Support for Representative Campbell

9/29/2010 For the 2nd District: Jim McCune, Tom Campbell

9/24/2010 Paid Lobbyists Are an Unnecessary Expense

6/9/2010 Campbell and Wilcox voice agreement in debate

6/7/2010 Expect unexpected as filing season kicks off

6/2/2010 Campbell refutes charges from Wilcox camp

5/6/2010 Campbell, McCune lead Town Hall meeting on taxes

4/16/2010 Bypass Work Kicks Off With Groundbreaking

3/31/2010 Legislative Update

3/24/2010 Bill to Crackdown Meth Becomes Law

3/2/2010 Electronic Tracking of Ephedrine a Good Idea

3/1/2010 Tracking system targets meth ‘smurfers'

2/25/2010 Use every tool to fight meth

2/24/2010 Campbell and McCune Chat with Voters in Graham

2/4/2010 Bill Would Further Track Cold Medicine

1/29/2010 City of Yelm Taking Bids For Longmire Restroom

1/3/2010 Health care reform hinges on act's repeal


2009

12/31/2009 Rep. Says He Will Fight For Bypass Funds

12/9/2009 Mt. Highway and 304th St. Gets Traffic Light

10/07/09 Lawmakers urged to provide hospital safety money

09/09/09 - Campbell's revised plans create a stir among Republicans

9/1/2009 Cross Base Highway: Alive and Kicking

08/31/09 - Rep. Campbell reconsiders bid to run for Congress

8/12/09 Medical errors: So much time, so little progress [PDF]

8/12/09 Medical errors: So much time, so little progress

4/16/09 Coalition of 'pirates' hold Legislature hostage

Published April 26, 2009

Session pirates, hostages fine; I-937 not

I don't even pretend to understand the machinations tonight, but it would appear the Democrats in the House and Senate have agreed to let their traditional last-hour fight end by killing the effort to toughen renewable energy standards on utilities and get on with the capital budget.

"It’s dead," said Rep. Tom Campbell, R-Roy, who backed the House stance on the measure. "It was a fun game of cards tonight. But the winners always say that."

He credited Speaker of the House Frank Chopp with negotiating an end to the stand off (explored here by able colleague Brad).

Chopp stopped by to grab another of the Pierce County pirates who had hijacked the capital budget over the matter, Rep. Steve Kirby.

Kirby returned two minutes later, and said, "He reiterated how important my vote was going to be tonight." But Kirby said his stance on the remaining bills was already clear, and noted he was certain everything would be fine all along.

Meanwhile, the capital budget has been merged with the bonds for the 520 Bridge, making it the largest bond measure in state history, said Sen. Karen Fraser.

"Welcome to the world of high finance," she quipped.

All told, she was now optimistic the session will end on time.

"Some go out with a bang, some go out with a whimper, some go out with a argument," she said. "This is going out with maybe, frenetic energy."

The delay by the capital budget deal may have saved the levy equalization program, by the way. Although the bill could still come up, time grows short, and the Republicans have made it clear they will stall it out. Heard Chopp spoke with DeBolt personally there.

Published April 26, 2009

Two reps on sine die

Compare and contrast a few comments from two local dudes, Rep. Brendan Williams of Olympia and Rep. Tom Campbell of Roy.

"Extremely frustrating. Horribly disappointed. This session was an unending assault on the people and values of the 22nd District," Williams said.

Campbell was more circumspect, saying I-960’s limits on raising taxes took the heat out of a possible special session on taxes.

"Been through this in '93. We were here to like three in the morning, Gov. Lowry was here, we had people crying, passing out," he said.

"We're actually getting things down I never thought we would."

News Tribune Blog

Washington Senate OKs ban on lead tire weights

Installers could face fines by 2011
Richard Roesler / Staff writer

OLYMPIA – Those little lead weights clipped onto your tires soon may go the way of lead type, lead toy soldiers and lead paint.

Washington’s state Senate on Tuesday voted to ban the installation of lead tire weights by 2011. Tire dealers will be required to use alternatives like zinc or a steel alloy.

The amended bill now goes back to the House, which is expected to approve it. It then goes to Gov. Chris Gregoire to be signed into law.

“The Asian and European car makers have used alternative wheel weights for years now,” said Rep. Tom Campbell, R-Roy, the prime sponsor of House Bill 1033. “We are just catching up to them.”

Lead is highly toxic, Campbell says, and it only makes sense to use less hazardous alternatives. It has been linked to brain damage and other nervous system damage, particularly in young children.

The weights, which have long been used to balance tires and prevent shimmying at high speeds, can come loose and be flung by the roadside. The state Department of Ecology estimates that 5 percent of wheel weights come loose. That would mean that vehicle wheels are dropping 20 tons of lead on roadways and parking lots each year. Worsening matters, Campbell says, the weights can be pulverized by passing cars, making it even easier for the soft metal to leach into rain runoff and soil.

Eighteen lawmakers, mostly Republicans, voted no.

“This bill seems to be a solution in search of a problem,” said Sen. Jim Honeyford, R-Sunnyside. “If you stop and look and think, where does lead come from? It comes from the soil. So it gets ground up, it goes back in the soil. I see no problem here.”

Some tire dealers are already phasing out lead weights. Les Schwab announced last summer that it was switching to steel weights at all 400-plus shops in eight states, including Washington and Idaho. As part of a legal settlement in a case brought by environmental groups, several major manufacturers have agreed to stop using lead weights in California by the end of this year.

Campbell’s bill would apply to weights installed on new tires or changed during routine tire maintenance. Businesses, rather than vehicle owners, will be responsible for replacing the old weights with safer equivalents. There are exceptions for large-diameter tires and vehicles with gross weights over 14,000 pounds. Tire businesses that illegally install lead weights could be fined up to $500.

Richard Roesler can be reached at (360) 664-2598 or at richr@spokesman.com. For more news from Olympia, go to www.eyeonolympia.com.

4/14/09 Bill on drug-resistant infections advances

Infection Correction

4/16/09 MRSA bills passed by both houses...

State house votes to ban chemical from baby bottles

Mandatory testing for drug-resistant infections is prudent policy

While the $20 cost per test is significant, the growing number of cases is becoming an epidemic.

Updated: Friday, April 17, 2009 12:52 PM PDT
By the Union-Bulletin Editorial Board

At a time when businesses are financially pinched, government mandates can become an even heavier burden.

However, there are times when the benefits to the public are so clear that it makes the added costs acceptable.

We believe that's the case with a mandate unanimously approved by the Legislature that calls for hospitals to screen high-risk patients for a deadly germ know as MRSA or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

An investigation by The Seattle Times newspaper found that the number of patients in Washington state infected with MRSA increased dramatically over a 10-year period. It went from 141 a year in 1998 to 4,723 in 2007. And Washington is not alone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in 2007 MRSA infections were the cause of 18,000 deaths across the nation.

This is an epidemic that must be stopped.

The step taken in Washington is prudent.

The proposed law, which has been sent to Gov. Chris Gregoire for her signature, requires hospitals to adopt a MRSA screening policy by Jan. 1, 2010. Hospitals would be allowed flexibility, but adult or pediatric intensive-care patients would have to be screened within the first 24 hours, according to The Seattle Times. Hospitals would have to notify patients of a MRSA diagnosis and provide education on treatment and prevention.

The legislation also mandates hospitals disclose isolation policies to patients. Some hospitals put infected patients and noninfected patients in the same room.

"People are dying, and we have to take action. I think that's why you're seeing unanimous votes in the House and the Senate," said Rep. Tom Campbell, R-Roy, the legislation's prime sponsor.

We agree. However, we aren't as cavalier about the cost of the test. The $20 price tag for the nasal swab that can detect MRSA will be a burden for hospitals and patients. The cost of health care is already high and every dollar added puts more strain on an already strained system.

Still, this is literally a matter of life or death and the cost can be justified with high-risk patients.

This testing program must be closely watched to determine if it is sufficient to reduce the spread of MRSA. If it is not, the Legislature should consider further action such as expanding testing.

4/16/09 Washington governor signs MRSA screening, testing bill into law

4/16/09

Mandatory testing for drug-resistant infections is prudent policy

While the $20 cost per test is significant, the growing number of cases is becoming an epidemic.

By the Union-Bulletin Editorial Board

At a time when businesses are financially pinched, government mandates can become an even heavier burden.

However, there are times when the benefits to the public are so clear that it makes the added costs acceptable.

We believe that's the case with a mandate unanimously approved by the Legislature that calls for hospitals to screen high-risk patients for a deadly germ know as MRSA or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

An investigation by The Seattle Times newspaper found that the number of patients in Washington state infected with MRSA increased dramatically over a 10-year period. It went from 141 a year in 1998 to 4,723 in 2007. And Washington is not alone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in 2007 MRSA infections were the cause of 18,000 deaths across the nation.

This is an epidemic that must be stopped.

The step taken in Washington is prudent.

The proposed law, which has been sent to Gov. Chris Gregoire for her signature, requires hospitals to adopt a MRSA screening policy by Jan. 1, 2010. Hospitals would be allowed flexibility, but adult or pediatric intensive-care patients would have to be screened within the first 24 hours, according to The Seattle Times. Hospitals would have to notify patients of a MRSA diagnosis and provide education on treatment and prevention.

The legislation also mandates hospitals disclose isolation policies to patients. Some hospitals put infected patients and noninfected patients in the same room.

"People are dying, and we have to take action. I think that's why you're seeing unanimous votes in the House and the Senate," said Rep. Tom Campbell, R-Roy, the legislation's prime sponsor.

We agree. However, we aren't as cavalier about the cost of the test. The $20 price tag for the nasal swab that can detect MRSA will be a burden for hospitals and patients. The cost of health care is already high and every dollar added puts more strain on an already strained system.

Still, this is literally a matter of life or death and the cost can be justified with high-risk patients.

This testing program must be closely watched to determine if it is sufficient to reduce the spread of MRSA. If it is not, the Legislature should consider further action such as expanding testing.


4/13/09 Legislature passes MRSA-prevention hospital guidelines

4/14/09 State legislators send MRSA-screening bill to governor

4/15/09 Washington Senate OKs ban on lead tire weights The Spokesman

3/18/09 Bill aims to stop spread of MRSA in hospitals The Olympian

2/23/09 Ending a culture of resistance to MRSA screening  The Seattle Times

2/19/09 State doctors' group fights MRSA screening bill  The Seattle Times

2/10/09 Don't go soft on Washington's "Three Strikes" law The Seattle Times
 



Rep. Tom Campbell receives award as Outstanding Legislator from the Governor’s Veteran Affairs Advisory Committee and the Washington State Dept. of Veterans Affairs. Pictured (Left to right: Auburn Mayor Pete Lewis, Rep. Tom Campbell and Alfie Alvarado, Deputy Director of the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs


Rep. Tom Campbell talking with DOT workers at the groundbreaking of the Cross Base
Highway Project. September 2008


Rep. Tom Campbell talking with an interested citizen at the Pierce County Fair.
September 2008



Governor Chris Gregoire compliments Rep. Tom Campbell for his work on HB 1103.
March 25, 2008


2008

11/12/08 Campbell named "Outstanding Legislator" for service to Veterans 
The Olympian

9/21/08 Incumbents Deserve Votes in 2nd District 
The Olympian

8/15/08 Campbell has unfinished business 
By KEVIN R. GRAVES
, Nisqually Valley News

7/19/08 Thousands join state program to help cut costs of medicine 
By ADAM WILSON
, The Olympian

3/25/08 Persistence pays off in bill The Olympian

3/12/08 Medical work discipline may change  By ADAM WILSON, The Olympian

3/8/08 Lawmakers' message to Air Force: 'Our national security is at risk now'  By BRAD SHANNON, The Olympian

2/27/08 Meth-vehicle bill merits OK  The Olympian

1/16/08 State House passes tax relief bill for disabled veterans The Seattle Times
 


2007


Rep. Tom Campbell with his Mother Edna Campbell and Governor Gregoire,
signing SSHB106, the Hospital Acquired Infections Bill, May 2007.

12/11/07 Public disclosure for hospitals,too The Seattle Times

12/1/07 Bill to push ban on lead-tainted toys
By ADAM WILSON
, The Olympian

11/18/07 Rep. Tom Campbell takes lead on MRSA reporting
By
STEVE KLEIN, yelmcommunity.org

10/31/07 Youth shelter coming to Graham area
By BRUCE SMITH
, The Dispatch

10/31/07 Health advisors opposed secrecy on hospital mistakes
By JONEL ALECCIA
, Spokesman Review

10/28/07 Public deserves access to date on hospital errors The Olympian

10/26/07 Our View: Knowledge is healthy
Spokesman Review Editorial Board

10/25/07 Hospitals backtrack on keeping mistakes secret
By
CAROL M. OSTROM, Seattle Times health reporter

10/24/07 Hospitals will disclose errors after all
By JONEL ALECCIA
, Spokesman Review

10/23/07 Mistakes hospitals don't want you to see
By
CAROL M. OSTROM, Seattle Times health reporter

10/19/07 Deadly superbug is here - why isn't it tracked?
By
CAROL M. OSTROM, Seattle Times health reporter

10/17/07 Alarming spread of superbug "a very big deal"
By Rob Stein
, The Washington Post

8/28/07 Health care licensing merits overhaul The Olympian

8/22/07 Audit blasts health care monitoring By ADAM WILSON, The Olympian

7/18/07 Interview with Rep. Tom Campbell
By
BRUCE SMITH, The Dispatch

4/12/07 Hospital infections reporting bill close to becoming law
By
CAROL M. OSTROM, Seattle Times health reporter

4/11/07 Hospital safety: more sunshine
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Board

3/19/07 Hospitals, heal thyselves
The Seattle Times

3/18/07 Report Infection Rates
The Olympian

3/15/07 House bill aims to cut hospital infection rates
Seattle Post-Intelligencer

3/15/07 Bill would shift authority for discipline in medical fields
By LEAH BETH WARD, Yakima Herald-Republic

3/3/07 Washington Legislator works to stop hospital-acquired infections
The Seattle Times

2/28/07 Do no harm, contd.
The Seattle Times

2/28/07 Dirty pretty things: the ugly stuff in cosmetics
By
LISA STIFFLER, Dateline Earth Blog, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

2/8/07 Legislature: Healthy monitors
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Board
 


2006

2006 Vote Campbell and McCune back to House
The Olympian

12/14/06 Democrats reach across aisle to fill 2 committee posts
By
DAVID AMMONS, The Seattle Times

11/6/06 Health Department: Better discipline
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Board

3/20/06 Area's legislators rate their session
By BRAD SHANNON and ADAM WILSON
, The Olympian

2/22/06 Malpractice deal is a "first step," but many tough issues remain
By
CAROL M. OSTROM, Seattle Times health reporter

2/27/06 Hospital infection bill dies
By ADAM WILSON
, The Olympian


2005

5/12/05 Meth Epidemic: Arresting key ingredients
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Page Editor

5/1/05 Serving the public, live from Olympia
By MARK TRAHANT, Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Page Editor

4/25/05 Bill would limit meth production
The Seattle Times staff and news services

4/8/05 Capitol Watch: Madness on meth
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Board

3/8/05 Cold drugs used for meth targeted
By ADAM WILSON
, The Olympian

2/26/05 House passes bill to license Canadian pharmacies; Some go north now to get medication for half-price or less
By REBECCA COOK
, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

2/22/05 Bills aim to crack down on meth by limiting cold-medicine sales
By
VANESSA HO, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

2/2/05 Lawmaker abandons House GOP caucus
By MELANTHIA MITCHELL
, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 


2002

3/20/02 New flag hangs on governor's OK
By MIKE ARCHBOLD
, Journal Reporter

2/19/02 Thousands rally against cuts in human services
By MELANTHIA MITCHELL
, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

2/1/02 House OKs regional highway financing
By
DAVID AMMONS, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 


2001

11/30/01 State seeks greater control over Medicaid
Goal is to cut back some services and ask the poor to help pay
By ANGELA GALLOWAY, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

 

home   |  supporters   |  email


Listens,  Cares,  Helps.